Bryan Ruby


Thoughts, Words, and Deeds

Eight Years of CMS Report

This week, CMS Report celebrates our eight year anniversary. No one is more surprised than me.

The original intention for this site was for me to have a place where I could blog about my struggles with content management systems. I also wanted a place to point friends and colleagues to articles authored by content management gurus way smarter than me. I've often stated that CMSReport.com was founded not by what I knew but what I didn't know about content management. Unknowingly back then, I stumbled across a very large community of developers, site owners, consultants, analysts, vendors and marketers that also wanted to join into this conversation of "not knowing". Now here we sit with thousands of articles posted by over 350 different contributing authors. What an amazing experience CMS Report has brought to my professional and personal life.

I spent some time this week looking back at the most popular articles we posted on CMS Report. Interestingly, a number of the articles listed have very little to do with content management. As the site's editor, I consider this both the blessing and the curse of hosting a website focused on content management systems. Besides providing the "reader's choice", I also have provided my own list of favorite articles that has been posted here on CMSReport.com. When comparing the two lists, you will find the only article to make both lists is the one comparing Drupal and Joomla. In 2006, it was the first articles I had written received well by enough readers to suggest CMSReport.com might stick around a little longer than I had first anticipated.

Most Popular Articles by Year

2006 - Drupal and Joomla Comparison

Need Customer Experience Management? The CMS Box is Big Enough

If you're an insider of the content management industry, you're well of aware of the recent claims by some that the content management system is dead. If you're still using CMS as part of your vocabulary, you must not be keeping up with the times because it's all about customer experience management (CEM or CXM).  This is what some want you to believe. It's wishful thinking by those that want to be at the cutting edge of something new and believe you do that by diminishing the value of what we know currently works. Every few years we go through this movement and every time history has shown that the demise of the CMS is exaggerated.

I wasn't going to enter this conversation, but I've had some people already misread my need to put some distance between me and CMS Report as a signal that I see a sinking ship on the horizon. From my perspective, the opposite is actually true with what is going on in the CMS industry. In the past few years, I've been busier than ever talking and doing "content management". Everyone from writer to CEO now understands that managing content is the key to reaching out to customers. Only those that see a CMS as "web pages" and not a vital asset to a company's information system seem to not recognize the value of content management. There isn't a vendor, developer, or business owner that I've talked to that said they can do without a content management system. 

Python, Java, C++ Top Three Popular Programming Languages

CodeEval recently released their list of Most Popular Programming Languages of 2014. Each year they release this list based on thousands of data points they've collected by processing over 100,000 coding tests and the input of over 2,000 employers. This list confirms what Python and Java developers already know. It is also list to disappoint Tcl developers and those nostalgic of the Visual Basic days.

According to CodeEval, the top five most popular programming languages for 2014 are:

  1. Python (30.3%)
  2. Java (22.2%)
  3. C++ (13.0%)
  4. Ruby (10.6%)
  5. JavaScript (5.2%)

What about the other C variants and PHP? You can see how they ranked and the the remaining languages on the list at CodeEval's blog. Of special interest to Web developers is that when compared to 2013, the data shows that popularity for PHP, Perl, and Java have shrank. CodeEval also notes on their blog that there has been increased interest in Objective-C, C#, as well as Javascript.

When Personal Schedules Cause Stress

One of the purposes of a personal blog is to leave behind the stress and confines of your professional duties and embrace a new adventure. However, it's easy to fall into a trap of bringing what you do professionally back home with you into your own personal space. I originally had planned to update this blog at a minimum of once a week. Sticking to schedules are a necessary part of my professional life and I was about to repeat that same approach here.

When I looked at my calendar to set some time to blog I began to see more of my free time whither away. I began feeling stress over something I should have complete control over, my personal schedule.

Sticking to a schedule is a great idea for professional blogs, but it's a horrible idea for those that truly want to "break out of the box". Your whole approach for supporting a personal blog needs to be different than your professional blog. If not, what is the point of doing a personal blog?

Join me on this Thursday's CMS Connected Webcast

If you have some free time this Thursday then you might want to tune into the CMS Connected's live webcast. As a periodic guest, I will be reviewing the Magnolia CMS platform in the show's Vendor Spotlight segment. Magnolia is an open source java-based content management system that is used in more than 100 countries across the world, by governments and leading FORTUNE 500 enterprise.

Showtime is set for Thursday, February 27th at 11:30 AM CST. If you plan on watching the webcast live, be sure and register for show at CMS-Connected.com.

The primary focus of the show will be on the shift to "Big Data".

How has Big Data changed your world? This isn’t just an “old dogs, new tricks” shift. Big Data is a massive paradigm shift that opens new doors and creates new possibilities that are an order of magnitude different from what previous generations had at their fingertips. So, how does one embrace the Big Data paradigm shift?

As part of our discussion on Big Data they will welcoming Seth Earley into the studio. Seth is a 25 year veteran of the technology industry and currently heads a consulting firm of which is is the founder and CEO.

Also, joining the show will be regular co-hosts, Scott Liewehr and Butch Stearns. A first, I think, DCG Principal Analyst Jill Finger Gibson will also weighing in on some of our big news stories of the show.